Angry about the Kavanaugh confirmation? We sure are. But the midterms are only weeks away, so it’s time to harness our anger and use it to take back Congress! Here are some ideas our chapters brainstormed that you can use to channel your outrage into action:


1. Send a personalized thank-you note to Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), the lone Republican who opposed Kavanaugh. She’ll be a crucial swing vote in the future too, so let’s show her how much we appreciate her principled, bipartisan act of political courage. You can Tweet photos of handwritten notes to @lisamurkowski, tag her on Instagram (@senlisamurkowski), and send emails to her using this form. (Her office says that receiving snail mail can be complicated by security screenings).


2. Encourage adults to donate to a fundraising campaign that’s raising money for the future progressive opponent of Senator Susan Collins, a blue-state Republican who voted for Kavanaugh and has a growing track record of placing party over principles. While she’s not up for re-election in 2020, Americans across the country have already raised $3 million dollars for her challenger. You can donate here.


3. Make calls for Beto O’Rourke. We have a shot of winning back the Senate, but only if we mobilize in crucial states. In Texas, Democrat Beto O’Rourke is challenging Republican Ted Cruz in a spirited campaign that’s drawn national attention. Texans have been turning out by the thousands for Beto’s rallies, and are drawn to his pro-immigration, universal healthcare, and racial justice stances. After Ted Cruz spoke out as an avid supporter of Kavanaugh’s confirmation, polling showed the two candidates neck and neck. Click here to register for the “Beto Dialer,” an online system that lets you make calls for Beto from home.


4. Create a wall of Post-It notes in your school where students can share reactions to the Kavanaugh confirmation, or find time during the day to host a discussions about the issue. We’ve found that these can be beautiful spaces for sharing stories and strengthening our collective resolve to act.

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